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One of our patients at Clifton Road Surgery kindly donated gloves and masks to keep our key workers safe during these uncertain times.  Thank you so much!  You will have heard on the news that personal protective equipment (PPE) is slow in reaching Practices and Hospitals if anyone is able to offer any PPE please help.  Thank you.

COVID19 coronavirus: what you need to know

 

If you’re concerned about #coronavirus, or you just want some more information — make sure you’re getting it from a reputable source. Visit nhs.uk/coronavirus for all the latest updates, and use the new dedicated 111 online coronavirus service. #COVID19

The new dedicated 111 online coronavirus service includes a series of quick questions to answer, and will tell you if you need medical help and advise you on what to do next. #COVID19 nhs.uk/coronavirus

 

 

Find out all the latest information on #coronavirus — including symptoms, how to avoid spreading germs and a new dedicated 111 online coronavirus service — by visiting nhs.uk/coronavirus. #COVID19

 

 

 

The new 111 online #coronavirus service can quickly tell you what to do if you think you have symptoms, or you think you may have been exposed to the virus when traveling. For this, and more information about coronavirus, visit nhs.uk/coronavirus. #COVID19


If you’re concerned about #coronavirus, or you just want some more information — make sure you’re getting it from a reputable source. Visit nhs.uk/coronavirus for all the latest updates, and use the new dedicated 111 online coronavirus service. #COVID19

Clifton Road Surgery would like to announce the arrival of our new Salaried GP, Dr Gower.  Dr Gower started as our salaried GP in August 2019 and holds clinics all day Monday, Tuesday and Thursday.  With this in mind we wanted to remind you that every patient has a named GP.  Now Dr Gower is in place it has been necessary to allocate him as named GP to some of our patients.  Please note, anyone concerned or wanting clarification of their named GP can speak to Reception.  Please be assured those patients we will be changing will not be having regular on-going appointments/care.  If any patient has objections we will, of course, put you back to your previous GP.  We have consulted with our PPG who support the Practice in undertaking this.

NHS Health Worker Awards - A big congratulations to our Primary Care Practitioner/Nurse Team Manager ..... Helen Merrigan!  Helen received a Lifetime Service Award for all her hard work and dedication to the National Health Service.  I'm sure you will join us in saying this is a well deserved award to an exceptional person, who goes above and beyond!  Well done Helen.

Please see the attached Advertiser Newspaper Article - published 27/12/18

Awards

When your child is unwell, it can be hard deciding whether to keep them off school. These simple guidelines should help.

Not every illness needs to keep your child from school. If you keep your child away from school, be sure to inform the school on the first day of their absence.

Use common sense when deciding whether or not your child is too ill to attend school. Ask yourself the following questions.

  • Is my child well enough to do the activities of the school day? If not, keep your child at home.
  • Does my child have a condition that could be passed on to other children or school staff? If so, keep your child at home.
  • Would I take a day off work if I had this condition? If so, keep your child at home.

If your child is ill, it's likely to be due to one of a few minor health conditions.

Whether you send your child to school will depend on how severe you think the illness is.

Please note: we do not issue Fit Notes (Med 3) for children if they have been absent from school or if they will/have missed an examination.

The following guidance is provided by nhs.uk and is helpful when trying to determine if your child is too ill for school:


Is my child too ill for school? 

It can be tricky deciding whether or not to keep your child off school, nursery or playgroup when they're unwell.

But there are government guidelines for schools and nurseries that say when children should be kept off school and when they shouldn't.

If you do keep your child at home, it's important to phone the school or nursery on the first day. Let them know that they won't be in and give them the reason.

If your child is well enough to go to school but has an infection that could be passed on, such as a cold sore or head lice, let their teacher know.

Chickenpox

If your child has chickenpox, keep them off school until all the spots have crusted over.

This is usually about 5 days after the spots first appeared.

Cold sores

There's no need to keep your child off school if they have a cold sore.

Encourage them not to touch the blister or kiss anyone while they have the cold sore, or to share things like cups and towels.

Conjunctivitis

You don't need to keep your child away from school if they have conjunctivitis.

Do get advice from your pharmacist. Encourage your child not to rub their eyes and to wash their hands regularly.

Coughs and colds

It's fine to send your child to school with a minor cough or cold. But if they have a fever, keep them off school until the fever goes.

Encourage your child to throw away any used tissues and to wash their hands regularly.

Ear infection

If your child has an ear infection and a fever or severe earache, keep them off school until they're feeling better or their fever goes away.

Fever

If your child has a fever, keep them off school until the fever goes away.

Hand, foot and mouth disease

If your child has hand, foot and mouth disease but seems well enough to go to school, there's no need to keep them off.

Encourage your child to throw away any used tissues straight away and to wash their hands regularly.

Head lice and nits

There's no need to keep your child off school if they have head lice.

See how to get rid of them.

Impetigo

If your child has impetigo, they'll need antibiotic treatment from the GP.

Keep them off school until all the sores have crusted over and healed, or for 48 hours after they start antibiotic treatment.

Encourage your child to wash their hands regularly and not to share towels, cups and so on with other children at school.

Ringworm

If your child has ringworm, see your pharmacist unless it's on their scalp, in which case you should see the GP.

It's fine for your child to go to school once they have started treatment.

Scarlet fever

If your child has scarlet fever, they'll need treatment with antibiotics from the GP. Otherwise they'll be infectious for 2 to 3 weeks.

Your child can go back to school 24 hours after starting antibiotics.

Slapped cheek syndrome (fifth disease)

You don't need to keep your child off school if they have slapped cheek syndrome because once the rash appears, they're no longer infectious.

If you suspect your child has slapped cheek syndrome, take them to the GP and let their school know if they're diagnosed with it.

Sore throat

You can still send your child to school if they have a sore throat. But if they also have a fever, they should stay at home until it goes away.

Threadworms

You don't need to keep your child off school if they have threadworms.

Speak to your pharmacist, who can recommend a treatment.

Vomiting and diarrhoea

Children with diarrhoea or vomiting should stay away from school for 2 days after their symptoms have gone.

 
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